Register    Login    Forum    Search    FAQ

Board index » General Discussion » Shamanism




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Why don't you call yourself "Shaman?"
 Post Posted: Sat May 18, 2013 3:45 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 9:16 am
Posts: 7
'Shaman' is one of the few titles which is fairly inclusive and does not have many limitations, in the way some spiritual titles do.

People will seek to understand what you are by referencing a title - some are lost if they cannot slap on a label.

Other practitioners who use the same title may also seek to impose their limited understanding or specific practices on you. Often it is in the form: 'You can't be a (Buddhist, for example) unless you believe X and do Y'.

Yes, it does happen in Shamanism, and I think honesty is important about who learned what from whom in order to avoid frauds.

If I see a Nyingma Tibetan Buddhist performing a mirror divination for a client, and see a village shaman doing exactly the same thing I regard both as shamanic practitioners. However, I wouldn't ever seek to impose a 'Shaman' label on someone who happens to include similar rituals in their own separate path.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why don't you call yourself "Shaman?"
 Post Posted: Thu Sep 19, 2013 8:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2007 6:50 am
Posts: 44
Location: Pennsylavania
I have to add that when a person is getting solid results and the people keep coming to him or her. Their dance card can get pretty full. Who has time for a title when coming home people are sitting at your doorstep.

I had to offer that one from both an observation and personal experience. I am sure there are a few people here who understand what I mean....lol

Traveler aka Jase


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why don't you call yourself "Shaman?"
 Post Posted: Tue Nov 12, 2013 11:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 30, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 30
I think that when you say you're a shaman, you are making a claim. That claim states that you have deep knowledge of the spirit world, and can heal people, see into the future, impart wisdom, knowledge.....ECT. When people start on the Shaman's path, their ego and pride is still intact. However, after many years of study, the shaman becomes humbled and realizes how much he/she doesn't know. It is then that you become apprehensive about making a claim.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why don't you call yourself "Shaman?"
 Post Posted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 8:38 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 25, 2010 9:25 pm
Posts: 136
I'm not one.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why don't you call yourself "Shaman?"
 Post Posted: Fri Aug 08, 2014 4:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2007 11:26 am
Posts: 181
Location: Bavaria, Germany
I am usually called "shaman" - I refer to myself not as a shaman because this word does not belong to my culture (which is not siberian, evenki). People come to me, because they say I am a shaman. They think I am shaman. So for the sake of simplicity I ask them what they think I can do for them as a shaman.

Usually the answers are very different.

However, I am a "Olorisha" - which is an afrocuban term for a priest of "La Regla de Ocha", which in fact I am. The only problem is, no one here in my vicinity actually knows this term, and when I tell them "It is akin to Voudou" all prejudices spring into their minds one can have about a priest that is practicing possession-rites and other primordial things like animal sacrifices, which are not so popular amongst modern esoterics. And no: We do not create zombies.

I call myself "bannsänger" and "condordancer", "zauberer" or "chaosmagier" - but all those titles or descriptions only can emphasize a part of what I am doing actually. Sometimes I am a storyteller of myths I know.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why don't you call yourself "Shaman?"
 Post Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 1:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2012 1:03 am
Posts: 30
Almost no one who practices spirit work (shamanism being one cultural term for it) in the western world is a "Shaman". Many of the pioneers who brought 'Shamanism' to modern culture put in place the stigma of not calling oneself a Shaman for a good reason. A person can work with spirits, heal the sick, tell stories, balance natural energies, perform exorcisms, cleanse energies, or anything else a Shaman does and yet not be a Shaman. You could learn every single technique there is to know about being a Shaman and still not be one.

A 'Shaman' is the leader of a community, and is generally the most knowledgeable person in the community when it comes to most anything about how to keep the community running, stable and happy. In most tribal settings this meant knowing how to heal the sick, predict weather and plan planting/harvesting accordingly, knowing what animals to hunt and how to not over-hunt and ruin the ecosystem, ect. They had many people whom they led in their communities who could perform these tasks as well, yet were not Shamans.

The best way to understand the role of the Shaman in a modern sense is to compare Shamanism to other similar cultural terms. For example: In the Wiccan Religion, the leader of a coven is a 'High Priest(ess)'. Generally they are the most knowledgeable about the craft and is the one the rest of the coven relies on. This does not mean that the rest of the coven does not know how to address their deity(or deities), pray, perform ceremonies or rituals. This simply means the entire community has placed a person or persons in the position to lead them, to help them become better than they are.

In conclusion, you can practice many things, be adept in those many things and still not be a "shaman". You are simply adept at the many things you practice. To take up the mantle of "Shaman", you must have a community to serve and lead, they must acknowledge you as their leader and you must maintain and excel in that role. If you do not meet those criteria, you are not a Shaman.

Note: Many traditions say that a 'true' shaman is trained only by the spirits and that without this 'marking' by the spirits a person will not be a shaman. I am not discounting this aspect, as in every tradition, there is a form of spirit induced training. The person spends many years learning, growing and training until one day they know enough to take on others with them into their Craft/Tradition. They then are put into the place to teach and serve that new community and are fully initiated as a Shaman(or High Priest(ess) or Pastor or any other synonym for the mantle) through that process.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why don't you call yourself "Shaman?"
 Post Posted: Tue Sep 08, 2015 12:21 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2014 10:01 pm
Posts: 12
Because calling yourself a Shaman, is like calling yourself a Hero.

It is bad taste. And it simply is not true. AND it is dangerous practice. Literally dangerous. DANGEROUS.

Anyone calling themselves Shaman (Who hasn't gone through a TRUE initiation) should be avoided at all costs, for their work will be mostly ineffective, and again, Dangerous. Just as you would avoid someone who calls themselves a Hero, who did nothing more than put on spandex and a big S on their shirt. It's pretentious, and it simply isn't true and it puts them and everyone else in unnecessary harm's way. Not only that, but it draws the wrong kind of attention.

It's the new fad. and it simply isn't true. It's the new fad. and it simply isn't true.



I suggest listening to Christina Pratt's podcast on whyshamanismnow.com ; She has lots to say on the subject. She is an actual initiated shaman.


Top 
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

Board index » General Discussion » Shamanism


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

 
 

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

phpBB SEO