Sacred White Buffalo ‘Lightning Medicine Cloud’ Killed And Skinned

Sacred White Buffalo ‘Lightning Medicine Cloud’ Killed And SkinnedLightning Medicine Cloud, a rare non-albino white buffalo, was discovered killed and skinned at Lakota Ranch in Greenville, Texas.
The white male buffalo calf was considered scared to some local Native Americans. The chance a buffalo will be born white is said to be 1 in 10 million, Fox News reported.

Private collection of Native American art, culture opens at UA history center

Private collection of Native American art, culture opens at UA history centerIt once held an esteemed position in the living room of the Bath Township home of Jim and Vanita Oelschlager.
When their grandkids first saw it some 10 or 12 years ago, Vanita Oelschlager said, they were downright frightened by it.

Peru’s Takiwasi Center Uses Medicinal Plants to Treat Addiction

Peru’s Takiwasi Center Uses Medicinal Plants to Treat AddictionDarkness closes around a circle of white-clothed figures seated in a thatch-roofed building in the Peruvian jungle. One by one, they kneel and drink a cup of liquid proffered by a gray-haired man seated on a low stool under a religious icon.

Ayahuasca May Hold Key to Breaking Addiction, But Canada Is Forcing Doctor to Stop Testing

Ayahuasca May Hold Key to Breaking Addiction, But Canada Is Forcing Doctor to Stop TestingDo you see them? All over Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside there are junkies, addicts and alkies. On street corners, in alleys, lurking outside the ancient hotels. All over Downtown Eastside there’s also help available for junkies, addicts, alkies—detox programs, 12-step meetings, residential treatment centers, methadone clinics, safe-injection protocols. Some of the programs are sponsored by the local churches.

Traditional Hmong Healers Learning to Partner With Valley Doctors

Traditional Hmong Healers Learning to Partner With Valley DoctorsThousands of Hmong refugees settled in the Central Valley in the 1970s and like most immigrants, they brought their own traditions with them. Back home, the Hmong were more likely to see a shaman than a doctor when they got sick and that has presented something of a challenge for health care professionals here in California.