Leaps into the Void: Group Show at Garis and Hahn Gallery

Leaps into the Void: Group Show at Garis and Hahn GalleryThe abstract patterns that were often displayed among depictions of wild animals, in ancient cave art, had been a real mystery to anthropologists for generations. Then, one fine day, an anthropologist in Africa was allowed to drink a hallucinogenic drug while entering into a trance induced by chanting, drumming and dancing. He soon realized that one aspect of his inner visions was a period of time in which he visualized the same types of abstract patterns he had seen in the famous caves in Europe dating back 30,000 years.

Archaeologists Say Cavemen Worshipped Meteorite After it Fell to Earth

Archaeologists Say Cavemen Worshipped Meteorite After it Fell to EarthA meteorite found in a 9,000-year-old hut believed to have belonged to a stone age shaman was probably worshipped by stone age man as a magical object. Archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology in Szczecin, in north west Poland, found the meteorite fragment inside the caveman house by lake Swidwe in Western Pomerania during excavations.

Ancient Mayan Altars, Sculpted Artwork Discovered in Guatemala

Ancient Mayan Altars, Sculpted Artwork Discovered in GuatemalaA team of archaeologists in Guatemala has discovered a council house dating back about 700 years with altars, incense burners and sculpted images of animals. Located at the site of Nixtun-Ch'ich' in Petén, Guatemala, the house has "two colonnaded halls constructed side by side.

New Mexico to offer free online 'curandero' class

New Mexico to offer free online The University of New Mexico is going to offer a free online class on curanderismo — the art of traditional healing.
The school announced this month it will create a Massive Open Online Course as an offshoot of its popular curanderismo class offered on campus every summer.

Children's aid steps in after 11-year-old trades chemo for native remedies

ChildrenA New Credit First Nation family’s decision to let their 11-year-old treat her cancer with Indigenous medicine rather than chemotherapy has prompted the intervention of Ontario children’s aid authorities.
“This chemo that I am on is killing my body and I cannot take it anymore,” said the girl, who cannot be named due to the involvement of provincial authorities, in a Tuesday video produced by Two Row Times, a free weekly distributed to Ontario First Nations reservations.