Healing the Wounds of War: New Ancestral Shrines in Korea

Healing the Wounds of War: New Ancestral Shrines in KoreaSince the decades of authoritarian anticommunist rule ended in the late 1980s, and the geopolitical order of the cold war collapsed in the wider world shortly thereafter, there have been several important changes in the political life of South Koreans. One notable change is found in the domain of ritual life or, more specifically, in the activity of death commemoration and ancestor worship. In increasing numbers of communities across South Korea, people are now actively reshaping their communal ancestral rites into a more inclusive form, >>>

Exhibit to feature photographs, artifacts of Florida’s Seminole-Miccosukee Indians

Exhibit to feature photographs, artifacts of Florida’s Seminole-Miccosukee IndiansThe Lee County Port Authority and the Lee County Alliance for the Arts is sponsoring an exhibit titled, “Children of the Everglades” at Southwest Florida International Airport.

It’s part of the “Art in Flight” program.

The public exhibit includes photographs of Florida’s Seminole-Miccosukee Indians and artifacts on loan from the Hanson Family Archives.

CCC kicks off its reading campaign with the selection of "Strong Medicine Speaks: A Native American

CCC kicks off its reading campaign with the selection of "Strong Medicine Speaks: A Native AmericanCumberland County College's One Book-One College 2009-10 reading campaign was launched recently with the selection of "Strong Medicine Speaks: A Native American Elder Has Her Say" by Amy Hill Hearth. Now in its sixth year, the college's One Book-One College concept was designed to get the campus and the community to bond by discussing relevant themes covered in a single book.

Ancient Dolls A Hint To Early Man

Ancient Dolls A Hint To Early ManFigurines, More Than 30,000-Years-Old, Found In German Cave
Small figurines carved from mammoth ivory more than 30,000 years ago have been discovered in a cave in Germany. Among the earliest undisputed artworks ever found, they are providing new clues into the migration and religious beliefs of early humans.

Music Had Charms to Soothe Prehistoric Man

Music Had Charms to Soothe Prehistoric ManFlute find suggests early ancestors more culturally sophisticated than thought

The discovery of a cache of prehistoric flutes suggests that music soothed the savage beast in early man as far back as 35,000 years ago.
German paleontologists found the flutes, made of ivory and bones from birds, in a cave in southwestern Germany. They date back to the Middle Paleolithic era and indicate that "early modern man" had more in common with today's humans than scientists realized.