Group seeks to crown first-ever aboriginal princess

Group seeks to crown first-ever aboriginal princessSOMBA K'E/YELLOWKNIFE - The Sacred Circle Project has begun its search for the NWT's first-ever aboriginal princess, with the non-profit organization planning to crown the winner on National Aboriginal Day.
The pageant - the brainchild of Lila Erasmus, project manager for the Sacred Circle Project - will aim to anoint an aboriginal woman, aged 16-21, with career aspirations, leadership chops and a solid supply of traditional skills.

In other words, don't expect a swimsuit competition.

Relationship Between Autistic Boy and Horse is One of Healing

Relationship Between Autistic Boy and Horse is One of HealingHow far would you travel to heal someone you love? An intensely personal yet epic spiritual journey, THE HORSE BOY follows one Texas couple and their autistic son as they trek on horseback through Outer Mongolia, in a desperate attempt to treat his condition with shamanic healing.

A complex condition that can dramatically affect social interaction and communication skills, autism is the fastest-growing developmental disability today. After two-year-old Rowan Isaacson was diagnosed with autism, he ceased speaking, retreated into himself for hours at a time, and often screamed inconsolably for no apparent reason. Rupert Isaacson, a writer and former horse trainer, and his wife Kristin Neff, a psychologist.

TV helps Aboriginal language revival

TV helps Aboriginal language revivalHere's a statistic I find pretty sobering: of more than 200 Indigenous languages spoken on the Australian continent before European settlement, fewer than 20 are still in daily use, and even these are endangered.

Once a people's language dies out, a vital part of their culture and identity is lost forever. That's why it's great to hear about Waabiny Time, a new show on the National Indigenous Television channel, which aims to get kids started with learning and using the Noongar language of south-west Western Australia.

Read more: http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/tv-helps-aboriginal-language-revival.htm#ixzz0pnbPFVbj

Marin painter of Native American ancestry helps street painting festival celebrate planet's four ele

Marin painter of Native American ancestry helps street painting festival celebrate planetFOR THE FIRST TIME in the 17-year history of the annual Youth In Arts Italian Street Painting Festival, the featured artists will be working together to create one giant image of the planet's four elements - earth, fire, water and air.

"Visitors will actually be walking around the earth," joked Laurie Vermont, festival director.

Whereas in the past the featured artists worked on separate images unrelated to each other, this year they all will be united in creating a circular 24-by-24-foot image inspired by the festival theme, "Bella Terra" - "beautiful earth."

Pagan Burial Altar Found in Israel

 Pagan Burial Altar Found in IsraelA 2,000-year-old altar where wealthy pagans worshiped has been unearthed in an Israeli cemetery, archaeologists say.

The 24-inch-high (60-centimeter-high) granite structure—adorned with carvings of three bull heads, ribbons, and laurel wreaths—was found May 17 during salvage excavations for a new hospital emergency room in the southern city of Ashqelon (see map).

One of the oldest port cities in the Holy Land, Ashqelon may have been inhabited as early as the Neolithic period, which began around 9,500 B.C.