Shamanic traditions inspire indigenous artist John Hudson to reclaim Tsimshian culture

Shamanic traditions inspire indigenous artist John Hudson to reclaim Tsimshian cultureThe piercing blue-green gaze is unsettling. Abalone shell eyes stare intently from the carved mask under a grisly crown of bear claws. In the indigenous world of the Tsimshian, the mask portrays a shaman pursuing a lost soul, determined to return it to the person suffering without it. The alder mask, "Catcher of Souls," is the work of John Hudson, a Portland wood-carver who's spent 25 years pursuing and restoring the traditions of his Tsimshian ancestors.

Celebrating aboriginal heritage

Celebrating aboriginal heritageNational Aboriginal Day, June 21, is a time for our country's first people and their descendants to celebrate and share their cultures and values with other Canadians.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Celebrating+aboriginal+heritage/3180226/story.html#ixzz0rVBxBEzG

Gov. Gen. Michaëlle Jean joins last day of Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Gov. Gen. Michaëlle Jean joins last day of Truth and Reconciliation CommissionWINNIPEG—Gov. Gen. Michaëlle Jean says the Truth and Reconciliation Commission examining the history of Indian residential schools is helping to refound Canada.

“This is what truth and reconciliation is about. It’s some kind of refoundation of our nation,” she said.

Native American Philanthropists meet in Cherokee

Native American Philanthropists meet in CherokeeEighteen leaders of Native American foundations that provide funding and other resources to nonprofit organizations met in Cherokee June 15-17 to design regional networks that will strengthen leadership in Indian Country’s nonprofit sector. The gathering was hosted by Native Americans in Philanthropy (NAP) and Cherokee Preservation Foundation.

Life as writer circles back to his origins

Life as writer circles back to his originsSpokane Valley resident Stan Hughes is on a journey and, while life itself is a journey, Hughes takes it to heart and the proof is in a name. Hughes’ “other” name is Ha-Gue-A-Dees-Sas, a Seneca Indian expression for man seeking his people.

His recently published book “Medicine Seeker – A Beginner’s Walk on the Pathway to Native American Spirituality” is his way of sharing his journey.