Aboriginal film decries threat to ancestral customs from water scarcity

Aboriginal film decries threat to ancestral customs from water scarcityThe drought that has affected the Murray-Darling basin in south-eastern Australia for several years has not only been a disaster for farming. The indigenous communities have also seen changes in the environment that endanger their ancestral customs, and though the rain has returned, concern for the future has taken hold.

Metis culture celebrated in Regina during National Aboriginal Day

Metis culture celebrated in Regina during National Aboriginal DayREGINA — School children, visitors, powwow dancers and performers all gathered to celebrate National Aboriginal Day in Wascana Centre on Monday.

In addition to contemporary artists and powwow dancing there were Metis weavers and Metis cart demonstrations.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/news/Metis+culture+celebrated+Regina+during+National+Aboriginal/3183579/story.html#ixzz0rgW2XoZy

World Cup: The real magic of South Africa

World Cup: The real magic of South AfricaAfter a cracking first half in the Free State it looked for all the world like Bafana Bafana could salvage their limp campaign and avoid ducking out in the first round.

With Hugo Lloris’ goalmouth being peppered and Uruguay upholding their part of the bargain belief coursed through the conduit of vuvuzelas from Polokwane to Port Elizabeth.

Aboriginal Day celebrated in N.W.T.

Aboriginal Day celebrated in N.W.T.People in the Northwest Territories celebrated First Nations, Inuit and Métis cultures on Monday as part of National Aboriginal Day, which is a statutory holiday in the territory.

Some of the largest events were held in Yellowknife, where people attended two separate gatherings this year: one being held downtown, and a more traditional Dene gathering at the Yellowknife River.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2010/06/21/nwt-aboriginal-day.html?ref=rss#ixzz0rbM7o7b4

Shamanic traditions inspire indigenous artist John Hudson to reclaim Tsimshian culture

Shamanic traditions inspire indigenous artist John Hudson to reclaim Tsimshian cultureThe piercing blue-green gaze is unsettling. Abalone shell eyes stare intently from the carved mask under a grisly crown of bear claws. In the indigenous world of the Tsimshian, the mask portrays a shaman pursuing a lost soul, determined to return it to the person suffering without it. The alder mask, "Catcher of Souls," is the work of John Hudson, a Portland wood-carver who's spent 25 years pursuing and restoring the traditions of his Tsimshian ancestors.