Lost story recreated by tribes

Lost story recreated by tribesBOSTON — Friday night, gathered around a “spirit fire” on the Hassanamisco Reservation in Grafton, they prayed and meditated.

Yesterday in the pre-dawn darkness, they ran from South Natick along Route 16 to Boston and paddled 20 miles down the Charles River to Deer Island, some in replica mishoons, the dugout canoe that was the principal means of travel for their ancestors.

Tribe wants federal status

Tribe wants federal statusHOLLISTER — The Haliwa-Saponi Tribe has announced a strengthening in their commitment to seeking federal recognition.
After 31 years of seeking recognition from the United States government, tribal citizens voted unanimously to continue the tribe’s cultural preservation and federal acknowledgment mission at their recent tribal council meeting.

Rituals of Native American Church offer comfort, sustenance

Rituals of Native American Church offer comfort, sustenanceThe light of a full moon through desert fog cast an ethereal glow around a spacious tepee as worshipers gathered in the foothills of Palomar Mountain last weekend for an all-night prayer meeting of the Native American Church of North America.

The Rev. John Nighthorse Tyler, a Northern Arapaho originally from Wyoming, beckoned 36 people to sit on blankets and pillows in a circle facing a carefully tended fire in the middle.

Colombian shaman arrested in TX, charged with Ayahuasca possession

Colombian shaman arrested in TX, charged with Ayahuasca possessionOn Tuesday, October 19, 2010 while en route to leading traditional Ayahuasca ceremonies in Oregon, indigenous Colombian healer Juan Agreda Chindoy was detained in the Houston International Airport. He was formally arrested by ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) for possession of his traditional medicine Ayahuasca. He is now being charged as a federal criminal and is facing up to 20 years in federal prison. Taita Juan is certified by his community and by the Colombian ministry of health as a traditional healer.

Spirituality and the Earth: Ancient festival of Samhain still celebrated in multiple ways

Spirituality and the Earth: Ancient festival of Samhain still celebrated in multiple waysAs dusk falls Sunday and hordes of Southwest Michigan kids in costume begin ringing doorbells for treats, many local practitioners of Earth-based spirituality will be gathering in sacred circles, lighting fires and participating in spiritual ceremonies to mark the ancient festival of Samhain (“SAH-wen”).
In Celtic tradition, Samhain (“summer’s end” in Gaelic) marks the beginning of a new year. It’s also the midpoint between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice, considered in ancient cultures to be a powerful time for magic and communion with spirits.