The Way We Are

The Way We AreTattoos had been used in ancient Greece and Rome to mark ownership of slaves and as punishment for criminals. Rather than being ornamental, the tattooing practices signified degradation, punishment, and permanent ownership.

The Elder -Caring and listening can hasten healing.

The Elder -Caring and listening can hasten healing.I've been around the ceremonial life and the teaching lodges of my people for more than thirty years now. It doesn't seem that long. The very fact of being part of a spiritual community lends time a different quality, one where time passing becomes more like time inhabited, each day, month, year joined in a stream of vital energy.

He's a sick man-Selebi's sangoma speaks

HeNtshingila, who is known as Zinyo Lebhubesi (Lion's Tooth) last consulted the former Interpol president in October.
He says he wasn't surprised when Selebi collapsed at his Pretoria home on Friday after he learnt that he must serve his 15-year jail term for corruption.

Hmong preteen next in line to become shaman

Hmong preteen next in line to become shamanKamolchai Hang, 12, of St. Paul, could become the next shaman in his Hmong family, continuing a religious tradition of more than 1,000 years.
Kamolchai was born in Thailand but moved to St. Paul in 2004 and has been raised as a Hmong shaman since infancy.

Why we invented monsters

Why we invented monstersMonsters fill the mythic landscape. In Hawaiian myth, there is a human with a “shark-mouth” in the middle of his back. In Aboriginal myth, there is a creature with the body of a human, the head of a snake, and the suckers of an octopus. In South American myth, there is the were-jaguar; in Native American myth, there are flying heads, human-devouring eagles, predatory owl-men, water-cannibals, horned snakes, giant turtles, monster bats, and even a human-eating leech as large as a house.